A Good Home, Canadian Gardens, The Garden in Early June, Tree Peonies

Garden Porn – ish

Well, it would be garden porn but we’re at that in-between stage right now.

Flowering plants are still budding up…

Blog Photo - Garden Peony about to bloom

Vines are twining up…

Blog Photo - Garden Clematis vine in June

And if it weren’t for the Jack In The Pulpits, cuddling up to an overwhelmingly tall hosta…

Blog Photo - Garden Jacks

Blog Photo - Garden Light Green large hosta

And these sweet little wild anemone flowers cozying up against the stone wall ….

Blog Photo - Garden Whtie flowers against wall

And the vegetable garden, with tomato plants and eggplants and peppers and herbs shooting up in the hot sun….

Blog Photo - Garden Tomatoes and eggplant plants

Or the annuals in pots, under the guardian’s unwavering gaze…. 

Blog Photo - Garden Face and flowers

Or the empty coffee mug forgotten on the Muskoka chair….

Blog Photo - Garden Mug on Chair

Blog Photo - Garden and pot and chair

Blog Photo - Garden Blue pots CU

And green stuff on the ground or climbing up the walls….

Blog Photo - Garden Path and Greenery

And this one and only bloom on this most reluctant tree peony…

Blog Photo - garden Peony in bloom

Overseen by a multitude of ferns and other shrubs not yet blooming…

Blog Photo - Garden peony shrubs and walls

I’d have nothing to show you at all!

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49 thoughts on “Garden Porn – ish”

    1. What a great image you created in my mind. I’d love that. I think we wouldn’t be reading though – we’d be chatting about your boys and how nicely they are growing up, making you a deservedly proud mama. Heck – I’m proud, and I haven’t even met them!

      1. Aw:). Thank you! And your kids would be in that mix. Maybe they’d even be sitting there, chatting away with us :-). It appears you have raised a beautiful humans, inside and out :-).

  1. Your gardens look beautiful, Cynthia! They do look inviting!

    Of the several peonies I planted a couple of years ago, only one bloomed this spring. We have had a cold, dry May, followed by a couple of days of cold rain. Our pepper plants and tomatoes were not very happy. Next week the weather patterns should boot us into the 90s. 🙂

  2. Lovely photos! Hostas are one of my favorites that come back each year, and I have two reluctant tree peonies myself! I can’t even seem to keep mine alive. Your garden is stunning and like others have said, so inviting. Thanks for sharing!

    1. Thanks for your lovely response, Jennifer. When we moved, we left behind a stunningly beautiful garden, created in the weeks before my injuries from a car accident, and lovingly cared for by my husband in subsequent years. That garden represents so much in my life — from great hope and love to despair — that it remains the quintessential garden. I’m surprised and uplifted by the positive reactions to this garden, perhaps because it is so very different, and because it is also in its infancy in some ways. thanks for your kind comments.

      1. You’ve made me think, Cynthia. Perhaps it is that all gardens are beautiful, and only you know the emotions attached. I loved that your husband lovingly took care of your past garden. My hope is that this new garden brings you lots of emotions as it matures and grows.

  3. Two questions. 1) Do you have any idea what those flowers are that are cozying up to the garden wall? I have them, too, and was thinking they were beguiling weeds. 2) what makes your chair a Muskoka chair and not an Adirondack chair? Your garden looks wonderful and about to get better!

    1. The little white flowers: Canadian Anemone. The Muskoka chair: It appears to be bigger, the arms more curved and the seat slightly different than the American version, but there are many variations. Americans claim they made their Adirondacks first, and we claim we made our Muskokas first. The Muskoka chair was already in use in the late 1800’s. Meanwhile, one Thomas Lee was vacationing in the Adirondacks when he built the chair associated with the Adirondack area. Could he have earlier vacationed in the Canada and seen the chair? Could that be why he did not claim ownership of the design? Muskoka’s cottage country and its great hotels attracted many Americans in the 1800’s to 1900’s, and there are apparently images of the Muskoka chair going back to those early days, so there is likely a connection.

      1. Great answers! I wrote a blog post once about Adirondack chairs and I can’t remember, now, if I came across the Muskoka chair while working on it. Whatever they’re called I love the look of those chairs but they’re hard to get up from!

  4. It’s happening! How beautiful, Cynthia! I designated your day to be the day between Livenhac-en-Haut and Figeac because I knew there would be a lovely house at the end. The walking day was full of difficult path markings and some grueling kilometers, but the home at the end was one I think you would like – full of Asian art from the hosts’ past travels and also some antiques and pretty quilts. I’ll try to figure out how to send you the images, and there will be more from one more French Chambre d’Hote in Arcambal tomorrow night. If I can’t send them via your contact email, I’ll post them on NotesfromaHike.wordpress.com. Bonne continuation dans votre jardin, mon amie!

      1. It will be about 2 more weeks of walking and then a few days in Santiago and getting home. I’m going down to Spain on Saturday for more. There surely are some interesting things to see out here, but I sometimes think that home is even more beautiful. I’m considering taking vacations online🙂.

  5. We have gotten behind on June Weeding Season, but hope to catch up within the week (before the next round of guests arrive). I did get to mowing along the driveway, keeping the grasses in check, while avoiding various interesting plants that we want to encourage. I found the beginning of sunchokes, perila (Korean plant grown for the leaves to make wraps with), tansy, some wild plants whose names I do not remember, lots of irises, various mints and sages that have escaped into the wild, and even a cluster of jack-in-the-pulpits! Now, if the deer have pleanty of other things to eat… – Oscar

  6. You made me smile a big smile when I read this post, Cynthia! Such a lovely garden with so many plants and flowers! I love the winding path disappearing round the corner and the chairs all ready for you to sit and admire the view and sip a drink or two!

    1. It is. In our previous garden, we had many, many blooms at this time of year. This garden has a lull, then picks up at the end of the month. (Unlike yours, which has various blooms year-round and especially in spring and summer.)

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