A Good Home, Family, Family Moments, Pets

The One & Only Jerome

If you’ve ever lived with a pet, or loved a pet, you already know that each one is a unique character, much like humans.

And if you have been owned by a cat, or been a servant/companion to one, you have a bag of stories to share.

Blog photo - Jerome CU

Pets usually become beloved family members. You may recall meeting some of ours here.

Our daughter Nikisha and son-in-law Tim have lived with two cats for nearly 18 years.  Jerome, aka Jerry, and Simon.

Blog Photo - Jerome sitting

Jerome and Simon have been a beloved part of all our lives — though in recent years, mainly through pictures and phone calls with us, since they now live in the US.

Blog Photo - Jerome and Nikisha

We still have a recorded phone message of Jerome meowing a strong “hello”.

Blog Photo - Jerome and Tim2

Jerome was, as Tim says, “a big orange cat with a sunny disposition” who met the neighbours and made friends before they did. “He had a knack for knowing when Nikisha and I were feeling down, and would comfort us.”

Blog Photo - Jerome on injured knee

“When I broke my leg, he would come and sit with me, sometimes on the broken leg, and purr away.”

Jerome was adventurous, outgoing and loved long walks.  Days after Tim and Nikisha moved house, he disappeared for several days.  We all launched a search, some of us doing so online.  My mother-in-law even put Jerome’s name on a prayer list.

It turned out that Jerry was trying to find his way home — to their former place. He was found and returned to the new home, tired and hungry.

Blog Photo - Jerome back safe and sound

Nikisha describes him this way: “An enthusiastic yet curmudgeonly host, he was always in the thick of every social event, though refused to give up his chair to guests as a matter of principle.”

Blog Photo - Jerome on Sofa 1

So you can understand that we have all watched with sadness as the cats have aged, and Jerome struck with diabetes and other ailments. 

We mourned along with Tim and Nikisha when Jerome died last week. Simon, his brother for almost all his life, was upstairs at the time, and began wailing at that moment.

Blog Photo - Simon 2

Nikisha says “It’s amazing how he knew almost immediately that Jerry was gone.”

If you’ve loved a pet, I know you’ll understand. If you haven’t, you may be surprised to learn how profound the loss is. After all, it’s saying goodbye to a beloved member of the family.

Rest peacefully, dear Jerry. Thanks for being in our lives.

 

A Good Home, Canadian Gardens, Garden Scenes, Twigs in My Hair - A Gardening Memoir

The Garden at Summer’s End

There’s a  freshness and tranquility in the late summer garden that extends into early autumn.

Blog Photo - Late Summer Garden Hosta and J Maple

The colours are more muted now, but no less impactful.

Blog Photo - Late summer garden hosta and birdbath MCU

Blog Photo - Late summer garden Hydrangea and chairs

Green leaves are greener, the pinks of sedum and blues of caryopteris can be seen more clearly.

Blog Photo - Late summer garden deep pink sedum

Blog Photo - Late Summer garden blue flowers of caryopteris

Even the trees are slow to turn orange and red this year, as if ceding the moment to the softness of this season.

Many tomatoes are still green on the vine.

Blog Photo - Late summer garden tomatoes

So this is how the summer ends:

Not with a bang, but a flower. A flower and some fruit…

Blog Photo - Late summer garden apples turning on tree branches

… and a branch of colour, peeking out to signal that autumn is on its way.

Blog Photo - Late summer garden Small Maple branch turning orange

I wish I were the kind of person who totally absorbs herself in the great now of it all, blocking all thought of the passage of the season.

But you may remember: I failed Mindfulness & Meditation 101.

As with the great times with loved ones, I’m greedy to want this moment to last.

Blog Photo - Late summer garden hosta white fragrant CU2

And when autumn blazes in with its glorious colours, I’ll find myself wanting to fix that in stasis too. For just a few more weeks.

It’s all a wan thought, a vain attempt, at holding off winter, you know.  We are a winter country but I’m not a winter person.

Blog Photo - Late summer garden - chairs and umbrellas CU

Note to blogger friend, September 9, 2019

“Yes, Laurie, there is a bittersweetness in the air, a time when we lose one thing and gain another, and even the flowers that bloom now are a reminder of the end of the flowering season.”

Note to my journal:

“I’ve long thought that gardening is a form of art. The soil is our canvas; we paint with flowers, shrubs and trees — always paying respect to Mother Nature. So let us add gardening to the canon of visual and natural arts, and recognize that we are, perhaps, the most fortunate of artists.”

 

A Good Home

From the Bookshelf: Twigs in my Hair, A Gardening Memoir, by Cynthia Reyes

hermitsdoor

A common Post-Enlightenment concept is that occupations have an art and science to them.  As a therapist, sometimes I approach an intervention from the science side, using the concept of evidence-based practice to guide the rehabilitation process.  Biological, neurological, or psychological theories set the pace of therapy.  At other times, I rely on the art of practice, usually when it comes to engaging and motivating a client to utilize the science.  I view gardening much the same way.  Ask me about soil health and I’ll give your two hour lecture on the benefits of fungus.  Then again, don’t ask me.  Let just take a stroll in the garden, enjoy the view, and I’ll show you some really cool mushrooms along the way.  That is the art of gardening.

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A Good Home, Flowering Fields, Flowers, Wildflowers

A Stream of Golden Flowers

Blog Photo - Field and Flowers CU

Blog Photo - Field and flowers

 

Blog Photo - Field, Yellow flowers and Trees and Sky

Blog Photo - Field and Flowers2 Nice pic