A Good Home, Doors Open Clarington, Heritage Homes, Lakeside living, March Cottage in Port Granby, March Hotel in Port Granby

Port Granby’s March Cottage

On Saturday, June 9, it will be Doors Open in Port Granby and Newtonville, east of Toronto. 

If you’ve never heard of Port Granby, you’re not alone. Once a thriving village and busy port, Port Granby is now a quiet hamlet on the shores of Lake Ontario. It’s home to several families.

Blog Photo - Doors Open - Hilltop farm
Hilltop Farm

Three of those homes, built during Port Granby’s heyday (between the late 1850’s and early 1880’s) are on the Doors Open Clarington tour this year: Hilltop Farm, the March Hotel and March Cottage. 

David March owned the latter two.

Blog Photo - Doors Open Clarington March Hotel old

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
March Hotel today

The records from that time usually showed only men as owners and proprietors of homes and businesses. So while there were certainly women in Port Granby, and David March probably had a wife, I haven’t found her name.

Blog Photo - Doors Open Clarington Port Granby boat load of people

March, like many others of his time, was clearly a multi-tasker: between the late 1850’s to the early 1880’s, he was the local innkeeper, carpenter, builder, postmaster, grain dealer, elevator operator and “general merchant” (shopkeeper). 

Blog Photo - Doors Open Clarington March Hotel2
March Hotel today

I’m told he bought March Cottage for his mother.  

Blog Photo - Doors Open Clarington March Cottage (2)

Blog Photo - Doors Open clarington March cottage exterior
March Cottage today

Today, both the old March Hotel and March Cottage are residences — owned by families who cherish their history.

Paul Sahota’s parents bought March Cottage in 1993: 

Blog Photo - Doors Open Photo of snowy cottage by Paul Sahota

“They saw it in the dead of winter and brought me to come see it on their second viewing. My mother sat looking out at the lake over the snow as my father and I tromped down over the bridge to the shore. As we drove away I asked my parents when they were putting an offer in, being so sure that it was the right place for them.”

Blog Photo - Doors Open Photo of Cottage and Gate Posts by Paul Sahota

 

Paul and his wife Susan took over the cottage nine years ago.   It was a daunting task at first, but the family has enjoyed many happy times there.

“We love that it is spacious enough to host gatherings with family and friends in all seasons. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
March Cottage Interior

“We love the soft shaded lawn for playing croquet, frisbee, baseball and cartwheeling.”

March Cottage includes original features ( e.g. the family-room’s fireplace),  and modern additions.

Blog Photo - Doors Open Photo of Cottage Garage by Paul Sahota

The family also loves the lake.

“We all spend hours watching the lake. We watch the waves (small and huge), the storms roll in, the many, many different shades of blue that the lake turns, the birds, ducks, loons, swans and heron come and go, the giant lakers, speed boats and sailboats move through the water and we watch for the calm when we can grab our kayaks and canoe and go for a paddle along the shore.

“The shore is a place to relax and get wet in the summer and, at times, an arctic adventure in the winter.”

Blog Photo - Doors Open Photo of Children in snow by Paul Sahota

The family will offer a warm welcome to visitors this Saturday:

“We have previously enjoyed other Doors Open experiences and are happy to share our little piece of Port Granby with the community.  We hope people get a sense of the history and the beauty of our community.”

For more information:

https://doorsopenclarington.wordpress.com/

Photo Credits: Paul Sahota; Bernice Norton & Christine McSorley (Doors Open Clarington) and Newcastle Village and District Historical Society.

Advertisements
A Good Home, Joyful Moments, Lakeside living, Nature, Nature Photography

Canoe on Sugar Lake

 

Hamlin Grange — my esteemed blog photographer– has many fans in my blogging community. So today I’m sharing a few of my favourites from his photo collection. I hope you will enjoy them.

Blog Photo - HG Canoe on Sugar Lake
“Canoe on Sugar Lake” by Hamlin Grange – (copyright protected)

Blog Photo - HG photo of Red Poppy

Blog Photo - HG photo of seagull and lake

Congrats, Hamlin, and thanks for allowing me to share these beautiful images on my blog.

~~

N.B. Please be sure to get Hamlin’s permission before using his images.

A Good Home, Architecture, Bond Head, Canadian life, Canadiana, Canadians, Country Living, Country roads, Farncomb Family History, Gardens, Heritage Homes, Historic Bond Head, historic neighborhoods, Home, Homes, Lakeside living, Life in canada, Lifestyle, Marina, neighborhoods, Newcastle, Ontario, Outdoor Living

Lost Without a Clue – Pt. 1, the Ebor House Series

I kid you not: I could get lost in a room. 

So – naturally – I got lost while coming home from an appointment in a nearby town.

Blog Photo - Bond Head main street

The key to getting lost graciously is to act as if where you’ve ended up is where you’d meant to go all along. But I was too agog at where I’d ended up to even pretend to be gracious. My mouth fell open.

Blog Photo - Bond Head Whtie fence and flowersIn no time at all, I’d gone from modern streets and brand-new neighborhoods to this old country road and a feeling that I’d time-traveled into the 1800’s. Beautiful old houses flanked both sides of the road.

Blog Photo - Bond Head White House1

And I knew, without being told, that some of these homes had belonged to certain local families for generations. It was that kind of place.

Blog Photo - Bond head grey hosue between trees

Most were surrounded by expansive grounds with big old trees…

Blog Photo - Bond Head Grey House and Lawn

Sweeping lawns and glorious gardens.

Blog Photo - Bond Head GRey House 3

On the lake side of the street, were more gardens, houses and infinite vistas….

Blog Photo - Bond Head Bayard and lake

Parkland and beaches and families at play….

Blog Photo - Bond head family playing by lake

Boats at the marina…

Blog Photo - Bond head marina boats in bg

People fishing…

Blog Photo - Bond Head Marina, Boats and Man fishing

Where on earth was I?

Blog Photo - Bond Head Boats at marina

Not one to panic till I’d run out of options, I kept going…  and thought I’d seen that enormous old tree just a minute or so before I turned…

Blog Photo - Bond Head huge tree and fence

So I turned around again and kept going…..

Blog Photo - Bond head lake shot

And discovered a sign…..

Blog Photo - Bond Head sign

Historic Bond Head.

I’d never heard of it.

Later, I’d learn that Bond Head, formerly known as Port Newcastle, was once a thriving harbour, with ships ferrying cargo to and from Quebec, Toronto to the west, Kingston to the east and various American ports.

In 1856, Bond Head and the neighboring village merged under the name of Newcastle. The overall region is now known as Clarington.

But right now, I was just busy being lost.

And then I saw a strangely beautiful old house.

This house must have a great story, I thought.

And this is how I met a man named Ron, whose historic home had belonged to generations of an illustrious Bond Head family which counted as relatives two Lord Mayors of London, England, and had a big impact on the life of many Canadians, including themselves.

I’ll introduce Ron, his house and the family to you in my next post.

Stay tuned.

**

Dedicated to lovers of history everywhere, including residents of Bond Head and Newcastle in Ontario.

 © 2008 CSR