A Good Home, Autumn leaves, Farmers' Markets, Heritage nieghborhoods, Maples, Natural products, Small towns, Villages

Natural Goodness Available Here

Photos by Hamlin Grange

I’m a sucker for certain things.

Like autumn days, farmers markets, natural products and villages.

So I’m smiling as I write this. A huge smile.

Blog Photo - Farmers market leaves on ground

My husband and I recently visited one of Ontario’s best-preserved villages: Unionville, northeast of Toronto. Founded in 1794, Unionville’s charm draws visitors from far and wide.

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Village Street and autumn leaves

But for the families who live here, it’s home.

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Story Old house

Some of our friends have lived here for decades – so Unionville is a very familiar place.

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Story Village Church

There are restaurants and specialty shops on the main street.

Blog Photo - Farmers market Story Street and pedestrians

An art gallery, churches and a square with live music every summer.

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Story Unionville Village Square

One of our favourite spots is the farmers’ market. Held outdoors in the summer, it moves indoors into the old Stiver Mill in the fall.

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Barn

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Sign and Vendors

Here, one can buy a wide variety of products – such as honey, fruit preserves and baked goods….

Blog Photo - Farmers Market The Strudel Guy

Blog Photo - Famers market Corey holds strudel

Trout, sausages and other smoked fish and meat….

Blog Photo - Farmers Market smoked Goods display and customers

And wine…..

Blog Photo - Farmers Market  Wine sign

Blog Photo - Farmers market Wine Vendor

Goodies galore and vendors with interesting stories.

That’s one of the reasons I like farmers’ markets: the people selling the products are often the same ones who grew or made them. They’re usually happy to chat.

Hilda Crick-McDermott worked for an international chain of luxury hotels and traveled to many parts of the world.

Blog Photo - Farmers market Hilda and Customer

When her son developed a skincare ailment called Kawasaki disease, she started making natural products for his skin.

“I struggled to find a natural product good enough to help my eczema-ridden kids, yet pure enough to be trusted for their dry and sensitive skin. I even wrote to a skin care manufacturer asking for help, but that resulted in rejection.”

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Hilda's Products

That rejection led to extensive research and eventually, a whole line of products, made by hand. Some ingredients used are: coconut oil, shea butter, peppermint and lavender.

Blog Photo - Farmers market LotionHilda says 90% of her SpaHket products are “anhydrous solid lotion; this means our lotions contain no water and as such are 100% pure natural goodness.” 

Yes — I tried Hilda’s products. They really are as soothing and fragrant as she says. They’re not cheap, but a little goes a long way.

Blog Photo - Farmers Market Shampoo Bars

Facing challenges, some see opportunity. Hilda seems likes such a person.

Her three children have done enormously well in school, she says contentedly.

Somehow, I was not surprised when she quietly added: “They were home-schooled.”

Blog Photo - Farmers market CR and Hilda

**Dedicated to all resourceful people.**

More about Stiver Mill Farmers’ Market:

http://www.guidingstar.ca/Stiver_Mill_Farmers_Market.htm

More about SpaHket products:

http://spahket.com/collections/

http://spahket.com/pages/ingredients

A Good Home, Architecture, Bond Head, Canadian life, Canadiana, Canadians, Country Living, Country roads, Farncomb Family History, Gardens, Heritage Homes, Historic Bond Head, historic neighborhoods, Home, Homes, Lakeside living, Life in canada, Lifestyle, Marina, neighborhoods, Newcastle, Ontario, Outdoor Living

Lost Without a Clue – Pt. 1, the Ebor House Series

I kid you not: I could get lost in a room. 

So – naturally – I got lost while coming home from an appointment in a nearby town.

Blog Photo - Bond Head main street

The key to getting lost graciously is to act as if where you’ve ended up is where you’d meant to go all along. But I was too agog at where I’d ended up to even pretend to be gracious. My mouth fell open.

Blog Photo - Bond Head Whtie fence and flowersIn no time at all, I’d gone from modern streets and brand-new neighborhoods to this old country road and a feeling that I’d time-traveled into the 1800’s. Beautiful old houses flanked both sides of the road.

Blog Photo - Bond Head White House1

And I knew, without being told, that some of these homes had belonged to certain local families for generations. It was that kind of place.

Blog Photo - Bond head grey hosue between trees

Most were surrounded by expansive grounds with big old trees…

Blog Photo - Bond Head Grey House and Lawn

Sweeping lawns and glorious gardens.

Blog Photo - Bond Head GRey House 3

On the lake side of the street, were more gardens, houses and infinite vistas….

Blog Photo - Bond Head Bayard and lake

Parkland and beaches and families at play….

Blog Photo - Bond head family playing by lake

Boats at the marina…

Blog Photo - Bond head marina boats in bg

People fishing…

Blog Photo - Bond Head Marina, Boats and Man fishing

Where on earth was I?

Blog Photo - Bond Head Boats at marina

Not one to panic till I’d run out of options, I kept going…  and thought I’d seen that enormous old tree just a minute or so before I turned…

Blog Photo - Bond Head huge tree and fence

So I turned around again and kept going…..

Blog Photo - Bond head lake shot

And discovered a sign…..

Blog Photo - Bond Head sign

Historic Bond Head.

I’d never heard of it.

Later, I’d learn that Bond Head, formerly known as Port Newcastle, was once a thriving harbour, with ships ferrying cargo to and from Quebec, Toronto to the west, Kingston to the east and various American ports.

In 1856, Bond Head and the neighboring village merged under the name of Newcastle. The overall region is now known as Clarington.

But right now, I was just busy being lost.

And then I saw a strangely beautiful old house.

This house must have a great story, I thought.

And this is how I met a man named Ron, whose historic home had belonged to generations of an illustrious Bond Head family which counted as relatives two Lord Mayors of London, England, and had a big impact on the life of many Canadians, including themselves.

I’ll introduce Ron, his house and the family to you in my next post.

Stay tuned.

**

Dedicated to lovers of history everywhere, including residents of Bond Head and Newcastle in Ontario.

 © 2008 CSR