Acts of Friendship, An Honest House, Book Reviews

No-One Is An Island

“In our view, An Honest House should be required reading for everyone.”  

Isabel Bassett, former government minister and CEO of TV Ontario and Ernie Eves, former premier of Ontario, wrote those words about my second book, An Honest House

I’m sharing their moving words here. For one thing, it allows me to salute Isabel and Ernie for supporting emerging talent, as well as ambitious and accomplished individuals from many fields.

Blog Photo - Isabel and Co
l-r: Tiffany Ford, Djanka Gajdel, Isabel Bassett, Cynthia Reyes

It’s often the little things people do that make a difference, isn’t it?

Telling others about someone’s new endeavour.

Bringing diverse groups of people together to meet and perhaps collaborate on a project.

Blog Photo - Ladies at Isabel gathering
Left: Mickey Palha. To my right: Heather Peterson and Silvia Wynter 

Or buying an author’s book and reviewing it. 

Bravo, Isabel and Ernie!

Here’s their review:

Image of "An Honest House: A Memoir Continued", by Cynthia Reyes

“As I read through An Honest House, I kept thinking that what happened to Cynthia Reyes could happen to any of us.

I wondered how all of us would  cope if we were stripped not only of our health but of our identities as successful, involved leaders and found our new selves to be  pain ridden, physically altered, and anxiety prone among other things.

Would we have the indomitable spirit that kept Cynthia fighting to regain her former self and role in life despite her enormous frustrations adjusting to her injuries following her accident?

How did she keep going?  

How did she find her new role?

Three of the many take-aways in this inspiring book stand out for me and my partner, Ernie Eves, who experienced loss of a different kind when his only son was killed.

The first, of course, is Cynthia’s determination, however wavering at times, to come back both physically and professionally.

Then, over time, as she realizes she cannot turn back the clock, there is her gradual recognition and appreciation of  the overriding value of what she has already: her supportive, caring husband, Hamlin, her two daughters and their families, her friends, faith  and community and, not to forget, her enchanting nineteenth century Ontario farmhouse.

The third inspiring finding for us is that Cynthia has managed to continue to play a significant role in Canadian life by writing books that show how someone can create new meaning and purpose in their lives, however futile it might seem at first.

Given the challenges all of us face at some point in our lives, especially as we suffer the debilitating side effects of aging, we can learn from Cynthia Reyes’ courage, determination and spirit.

In our view, An Honest House should be required reading for everyone.”

— Isabel Bassett and Ernie Eves.

~~~

Thank you, Isabel and Ernie. I share the credit with three extremely caring editors, a dogged publisher, great beta readers, my loving family and friends. 

I’m grateful for all of you who extend yourselves to help others — especially in tough times.

 

 

Advertisements
A Good Home, Acts of Friendship, Thanks

A Flower for My Friends

Blog Photo - Tulip Red and Yellow

Dedicated to everyone who has helped me along the way — with great thanks. Some of you have known me for years, some only through my books and blog. You’ve encouraged me, prayed for my family and me in tough times, and helped keep me upright!

I’m most grateful.

Wishing you a lovely day,

Cynthia.

A Good Home, Acts of Friendship

6 WAYS TO HELP A SICK/INJURED FRIEND

Thanks for your support in recent weeks. It reminds me: it’s so important to reach out to others in times of stress, illness or other need. I offer these tips (please add your own):

  1. Call. And call again. It matters to your friend, even if they can’t come to the phone. Some friends called even when I couldn’t think or speak clearly. They ended up talking with my husband. We both appreciated their effort.
  2. Send a card. In these days of quick email, a personal card is a valued touch. Personalize it with your own caring or inspirational words. A few friends reassured me: “This is just a temporary  setback, Cynthia. You WILL recover!”  
  3. Use email. Some friends sent me uplifting e-cards and jokes. Some sent me photos of their garden. And friend Carl visited and took photos of our garden, since I couldn’t go to see it myself. Then he sent me a picture of one flower every week. Those jokes, e-cards and photos cheered me.
  4. If possible, bring soup! Family friend Eva showed up with soup and magazines. I had a concussion and couldn’t read at first. I also had no appetite. But that soup kept me going in the early days after my fall. Later, friends John and Anne travelled a long way to bring us a delicious meal and spend time with my husband and me.
  5. Ask “How may I help?” My friend Gail, a great cook, kept asking. One day, I realized that I wanted Jamaican food. So Gail cooked oxtail and broad beans (with rice ‘n’ peas) and both couples had a great evening together.
  6. Pray. Let your friend know you’re sending good vibes and/or praying for him/her and their loved ones. I could see that my family was deeply distressed in the first three weeks after my fall. Knowing friends at church and elsewhere were praying for them was a comfort.

And yes, my friends who wrote via my blog and Facebook: I read your caring wishes as soon as I could. Those wishes warmed my family’s hearts, as well as mine. Thank you.

Cynthia.

Photo below by Hamlin Grange

Blog Photo - Doors Open The Grange Magnolia CU by Hamlin